How to Get Free YouTube Subscribers

our YouTube subscriber count isn’t just another vanity metric. Getting more subscribers is the best way to maximize your organic reach on the second-largest website in the multiverse.

And if your goal is to actually make money on YouTube, hitting subscriber milestones is necessary to access many monetization features. For instance, you need at least 1,000 subscribers to become a YouTube Partner and start earning ad revenue. And the more subscribers you have, the higher you rise on YouTube’s fancy “benefit level” ladder (think: awards, managers, production aid.).

But for those of us who aren’t trying to go viral or become YouTube stars—we can hear you out there, you’re saying “But I’m just here to support my brand’s digital strategy with long-form video!”—subscribers are still crucial. Why?

Because 70% of the one billion hours of video that people watch on YouTube every day is decided by the YouTube algorithm. Which means that your ability to reach new eyes improves when you have subscribers who are bumping up your play counts, watch time, and engagement.

How to get free YouTube subscribers: 17 tips

And now, in order from easiest to most complicated, our best practices for converting viewers into subscribers. Don’t tackle them all at once. Try out one of these tips for each new video you post, or implement one a week. Here we go.

1. Ask your viewers to subscribe

I told you we’re starting with the easiest ones first.

Sometimes your audience just needs to be reminded. The big red subscribe button is omnipresent, but you might also want to point out the bell beside it that turns on notifications for your new videos. Simple.

If you’re already doing this, remember to demonstrate why your channel is worth subscribing to. And make sure you do it right when they love you the most (e.g., right after you’ve provided new and useful information, or you’ve made them laugh). Don’t do it too much, or you’ll risk turning people off.

2. End your videos by mentioning the one you’re working on next

Subscribing to a YouTube channel is an act of anticipation. Viewers who’ve just seen what your brand is about are primed to want more, if you’ve done your job right.

Hyping your next video, and making it clear why it’s not to be missed, is the most organic way to encourage people to tap subscribe.

3. Interact with your audience and make friends

If you form relationships with your viewers, they’re more likely to want to keep watching your work. Respond to comments. Follow their channels back.

Also, once you’re plugged in, your audience will provide you with plenty of free content ideas for your next video. Don’t worry, you don’t have to take all of them.

4. Update your channel art

Your YouTube banner welcomes everyone who clicks over to check out your channel. Maybe they just watched a video and are looking for more. Maybe they’re a potential subscriber. Put your best foot forward.

Your banner needs to be clean, on-brand, compelling, and—this is the fussy part—optimized for all devices. You don’t want important details covered up by your social media buttons, for instance.

5. Brand your thumbnails

A thumbnail is a 1280 x 720px still image that acts as a cover for your video. And they are also your first, best chance to persuade people to click on your video. (Aside from your video titles, that is, but more on that later.)

While some might advocate using the most “eye-catching” design (which seems to mean screaming red capslock over a man’s shocked face and a picture of a… tomato?), one size does not fit all on YouTube.

You want to aim for consistent branding in all your thumbnails. Use the same font, the same colour palette, or even the same frame composition so people know (at least subconsciously) that they’re looking at a video from your channel.

6. Embed your videos on your website or blog

This one is win-win, because embedding video on your website may well help your site’s search rankings with the Google algorithm. And as far as YouTube subscribers go, you’re presenting your video right where the people most likely to care about it are already looking.

7. Use YouTube’s clickable tools in your videos

YouTube killed annotations a few years back, and good riddance. Pop-ups are one 90s throwback we’re all better off without.

That said, YouTube has some other, less annoying, tools for you to use:

  • End screens: these are still images at the end of your video where you can remind people to subscribe, or insert another call to action, before YouTube’s algorithm moves them on to the next video.
  • Branding watermarks: this is an extra subscribe button that will hover over your video throughout, even in full screen. Like so:

8. Think in terms of playlists

Playlists are a great way to increase your channel’s watch time. They also motivate people to click subscribe by lining up your best content in one place.

9. Run a contest

If you want a short-term bump in engagement, or just feel like you’ve been languishing in a subscriber count plateau.

Key steps include choosing a prize that matters to your audience, and asking viewers to subscribe and turn on notifications in order to participate.

10. Celebrate your subscriber milestones

Everyone loves a round number. Celebrate them and thank the people who got you there.

11. Release videos on a consistent schedule

Many experts confidently cite a rule-of-thumb as to how often creators should post video to their channels. For instance: one video a week to start, increasing to 3-4 week as your channel grows.

The theory is that more videos = more watch time from viewers. But prioritizing quantity over quality has drawbacks.

If your goal is to convert viewers to subscribers, you need to focus on quality first, and consistency next. (Then you can start worrying about quantity.)

If you upload videos consistently, then people know that more good content is coming, and they’re more likely to tap subscribe.

12. Entice your audience over from other social media channels

This means cross-promoting on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook—wherever you have a community of fans established.

This can be as simple as encouraging people to check out your YouTube channel in your Instagram or Twitter bio.

Alternately, you can make the most of your investment in video production by cross-posting your content across channels.

13. Do your keyword research to title your videos and define your niche

This tip is very important for earning views, so it bears repeating.

Looking at the keywords related to your subject matter that people are already searching for on YouTube will help you title your new video and choose your tags. But it might also lend inspiration for your next video topic.

14. Give people what they don’t even know they want yet

80% of your videos should be SEO-focused (see the previous tip) to bring in new eyeballs, but that leaves 20% for value-added content. By which we mean exclusive videos that no one else can make, or no one else has thought of.

Because in order to get people to click that subscribe button, you need to go beyond functionality and provide value outside of established search patterns.

15. Create topical videos, as well as evergreen ones

Here’s another 80/20 rule for you. 80% evergreen, 20% topical.

Evergreen content is important to bump up your watch time, yes. (Halloween videos are not so popular come February.) But topical content is key if you’re trying to convince people to subscribe.

16. Partner with other channels

This goes all the way back to Tip #3: Make Friends. Use your connections to partner with other YouTube creators and leverage each other’s audiences. Your audience trusts your recommendations, and their audiences trust theirs, so take advantage.

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